Posts Tagged ‘Phife Dawg’

Quick Hit or Miss – ATCQ’s We Got It From Here…Thank You 4 Your Service

November 16, 2016

we_got_it_from_here_thank_you_for_your_serviceI’ll admit I was skeptical when I heard the rave reviews of Tribe’s new album.  When a legendary group puts something out after such a long absence, critics usually take one of two paths:  savaging the new material as not living up to the old stuff or a triumphant return to form.  I became less skeptical when I saw no drop off in the comments from friends.  Now having listened to the album a few times, I’m going to join in and proclaim this one a Hit.

The album starts off on fire with several tracks that could work their way into a top 10-15 ATCQ track list for me and I think this album might possibly move ahead of their debut in my personal rankings of their albums.

I was trying to pinpoint how to describe the difference between the sound of “classic” Tribe and this album.   It boils down to this: the “classic” albums, particularly Low End, have a laser-focused consistency that was comforting. You knew you were getting a fat boom-bap beat coupled with sweet jazz samples.  And all was good.

The new album certainly retains most of the boom-bap anchor and there’s still some jazz style, but it spreads into other areas not really explored before in the classics. Electric guitars (We The People and several Jack White shreds on the latter third of the album ),more collage-style samples (opener Space Program), and  some R&B (Enough!!) to name a few. This could be a disaster, but I think it mostly works and is a more interesting listen than if they just tried to recreate Low End.

Obviously the other element here are the raps. Both Q-Tip and Phife (R.I.P.) still bring it. And to come back after 18 years (which in hip hop years is like 50 I think if my math is right) with the same mix of dexterous wordplay, humor and braggadocio is special. Never one to shy from confrontation with social issues, and they realized in 2015-16 stakes is high, they come right out the gate with some of their most political songs ever.

They bring along more guests than on the classics, though nothing hits Scenario heights. Speaking of, Busta Rhymes is all over this and I have nothing bad to say about that; he can still hype up a track with the best of them. Andre 3000 makes a few appearances and he remains a national treasure when it comes to guest verses. And nodding to the new generation, Anderson .Paak and Kendrick Lamar, fit right in.

There’s not a bad song in the bunch, I think the last track on Disc 1, Enough!!, is probably the weakest and I won’t begrudge them for the obvious Phife tribute Lost Somebody, but I think the album’s last track, The Donald, is a more fitting tribute to him.  He (and Q-Tip) drop their final verse as A Tribe Called Quest and Phife goes down swinging, ready to take on all comers: “No doubt, I’mma set it, dudes best be ready/off top on the spot, no reading from your Blackberry/Leave the iPhones home, skill sets must be shown/i’mma show the real meaning of the danger zone.”

Leave you with a link to a guy who gets it, jamming to album highlight We The People…

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RIP Phife Dawg

March 27, 2016

It’s been a busy week, but wanted to put down a few words in memory of Malik Taylor, better known to fans of A Tribe Called Quest as Phife Dawg.  Or the Five Foot Assassin. Or spitter of rhymes like “i never half step, cuz I’m not a half stepper/drink a lotta soda so they call me Dr. Pepper” and “Hey yo Bo know this and Bo knows that / But Bo don’t know Jack / cause Bo can’t rap.”

ATCQ, probably more than any other hip hop group, drew me full bore into hip hop as a teenager.  As a “rock n roll” kid, my exposure to hip hop was quite limited and I was drawn to the more rock beats of Beastie Boys and some Run DMC.  The debut from De La Soul was too foreign for me at the time.  I missed ATCQ’s debut in 1990, but for reasons I can’t remember now I bought their second album The Low End Theory.  CDs were new to me as my family had only recently gotten a CD player, and I had only a handful.  So, by default the discs I had got a lot of airplay.

But this disc got the most airplay (even more than Nirvana’s Nevermind).  The beats, influenced by jazz, were amazing.  But, more than anything, it was the rhymes.  There was a youthful exuberance, wit, and humor (even when tackling serious subjects) that just speaks to a young person.  And Phife Dawg’s verses were all of those things.  For a nice list of some of his verses, look at this piece.  And a lot of those I can just hear him rapping them as soon as I saw them on the written page.

The wave of pieces and tributes that have come out in the past week is testament to Phife’s place in the canon of hip hop greats.  And for me personally, the fact that he, as an integral part of ATCQ, made me, and no doubt many others, love hip hop is a great legacy for any artist.  RIP.